04 May

Skilled migration in an unequal world

It has been long time since “brain drain” became a buzz-world for policy-makers around the globe. Coined to capture the emigration of British scientists from the United Kingdom, “brain drain” has come to designate a unidirectional transfer of skilled and educated workers from human-resource poor countries to countries that are more prosperous.

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03 May

Education Among Syrian Refugee Youth in Urban Settings in Turkey

In March, 2017, six years since the start of the Syrian civil war, the UNHCR announced that the number of Syrian refugees in neighboring countries had surpassed 5 million. Now in its seventh year, the war in Syria has cost more than 3.3 million Syrian school-aged children their education.

 

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03 May

Education System Reform: voices from the resistance

A reportage on education system reform, and resistance voices, in Mexico. 

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03 May

Educational Equality Among Whom?

Because education is of both intrinsic and instrumental value for each and every individual, educational justice calls for an equal opportunity to education for all.

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03 May

How to understand academic disadvantage in PISA assessments in Latin America region?

One of the key issues in the use of large-scale assessments, which aims to inform policy, is to be able to translate results into a meaningful interpretation of the learning levels that students within school systems have attained.

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04 Mar

The Potential for Social Investment Re-engineering in Europe

Social investment emerged as a way to reconcile the design  of social policy with the improvement of economic competitiveness in Europe. This approach has recognised that, in a fast changing society, in order to create the prerequisites for human flourishing, there are new social risks that need to be addressed. Welfare provision needs to 'prepare' individuals to overcome new   risks rather than simply 'repair' damages.

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04 Mar

Achieving sustainable development through local currency financing

What can we do to reduce systemic FX risk in developing countries? The most successful, proven innovations have been: (1) reforms to deepen and broaden domestic financial intermediation in local currency and (2) blended finance solutions to ensure FX risk is not transferred to the vulnerable. 

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04 Mar

Supporting early stage social entrepreneurs in India: UnLtd India

A thriving startup environment has, in turn, given rise to an active and vibrant Indian social innovation ecosystem. UnLtd India’s Incubation Programme provides a unique combination of financial and non financial support in the form of fellowships, to early stage social entrepreneurs in India.

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04 Mar

Promoting food security and sustainable job creation in rural South Africa: Bokamoso Impact Investments

Bokamoso Impact Investments is a social enterprise dedicated to connecting the invisible rural population of South Africa to opportunity via empowerment, using a diverse entrepreneurial platform.

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04 Mar

The contribution of ICTs to Social Policy Innovation. Evidence and policy implications

To support the implementation of the Social Investment Package, the Joint Research Centre, in partnership with the Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, engaged in a multi-year research project on “ICT-enabled Social Innovation to support the Implementation of the Social Investment Package”.

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20 Jan

HIV: Challenges and Opportunities in finding its Panacea

Currently, there is no cure and no preventive vaccine for HIV/AIDS.  Antiretroviral therapy has considerably improved treatment, but it has has major side effects and is ineffective in patients in whom the virus develops resistance to the antibiotics. How does the future look like for HIV prevention and treatment?

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18 Jan

Voices from the field: my Experience working with the Avahan AIDS initiative

The Avahan AIDS Initiative was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation with the main goal to reduce the spread of HIV in India and lower the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in vulnerable high-risk populations through education programmes such as condom promotion, behaviour change communication, community mobilisation, and advocacy

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18 Jan

The Law matters in the battle against HIV/AIDS: Guinea and South Africa

HIV specific criminal law is being applied to those who transmit or expose others to HIV contamination. However, there is no demonstration that the application of criminal law to HIV transmission will stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. Rather, the criminalization of HIV risks undermining both human rights and public health.

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18 Jan

Pre Exposure Prophylaxis: where does it stand for young women?

HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) – where antiretrovirals are administered pre-emptively to at risk individuals who have not yet been exposed to the disease-causing agent. – is a promising, female-controlled HIV prevention strategy.

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01 Dec

US Climate Policy under President Trump: Why the Sky is Dark, but not Falling

Trump’s disparaging words on climate change are distressing. Trump has pledged to “cancel” the Paris Agreement, “dismantle” the US Environmental Protection Agency, and “cancel billions in payments to U.N. climate change programs.” With such radical and scientifically ignorant positions being advocated by the president-elect, many of us—myself included—saw November 8th as the day the sky began to fall. Fortunately, our domestic democratic institutions and the global response to climate change are bigger and more resilient than any one man.

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01 Dec

The end of the age of hyperglobalization

Trump has been quite radical on trade policy. A comprehensive analysis shows that there this a widespread problem with trade and hyperglobalization. Is this juncture an opportunity to rethink some aspects of liberalism?

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01 Dec

The Banality of Trump’s islamophobia

Anti-Muslim rhetoric has become a useful tool for European right-wing populists to mobilize voters. In his 2016 electoral campaign, President-elect Donald Trump adopted a similar strategy and employed rhetoric demeaning entire groups of people like Muslims, but also immigrants and refugees.

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01 Dec

Globalizing the agenda of #Blacklivesmatter

The Black Lives Matter movement developed in reaction to how 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was posthumously placed on trial for his own murder. The founders, Alicia Garza, Opal Tometi, and Patrisse Cullors, position the movement as a stance against state violence directed at African American. that deprives blacks of their basic dignity and political rights. They define state violence as poverty, genocide, systemic violence against, and exploitation of, the black queer community and black women and girls, mass incarceration, immigration policy, and ableism. They aspire to build a new black liberation movement aimed at stopping the systematic and intentional targeting of all blacks.

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01 Dec

Decoding US-Russia Cyberelations

The interferences by Russian hackers are only the last of several accusations made by the US towards the Kremlin. First, it follows the official accusation that, in July 2016, Russia allegedly hacked the Democratic National Committee’s computer network and stole more than 19,000 e-mails of Democratic party members.

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09 Nov

Dimensions of Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

In the last two decades, the world has achieved a vast improvement in social living conditions for the global poorest population. The 2015 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report unveils an outstanding world performance: people living under extreme poverty declined from 47 percent in 1990 to 14 percent in 2015, falling from 1.9 billion to 836 million.

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08 Nov

Multidimensional Poverty: The lack of Social Security in Mexico

In Mexico, 55.3 million people live in poverty and social security deprivation is a main challenge for policy-makers. This article studies the social security program in the country, and their implementation.

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08 Nov

Hunger and Obesity: the two faces of poverty

According to FAO, 795 people do not have enough food to lead a healthy life. To this, we should us the burden of malnutrition. As a result, in a Latin American house, now, you can have an obese person and a person without adequate nutrition, and they leave under the same roof.

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08 Nov

Nine strategies to reduce inequality

A Policy-Agenda to reduce inequalities in Latina America.

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08 Nov

Development Challenges in Latin America and the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

In Latin America, the UN Economic Commission (ECLAC) has the mandate to coordinate and support the implementation of the SDGs, AAAA, and the Paris Agreement. This article assesses priorities and challenges in the region.

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03 Oct

Decentralising power in Asia: Where are we?

Decentralisation has been in the development agenda for a couple of decades now. This article discusses some of the lesser-known innovations from Asian countries and challenges that they still grapple with.

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03 Oct

Localising the SDGs

The 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) will soon translate into responsibilities that will be shared by local governments. Hence localisation of the SDGs must be fleshed out without delay.

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03 Oct

Let needs speak

The age of top-down foreign aid is over. Forms of inclusive and decentralised governance are crucial to make international development go.

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03 Oct

Bringing politics back to squares, literally

The consensus in favour of multiculturalism is cracking. A wide range of political parties is targeting minorities and migrants. Small-scale deliberative spaces at the neighbourhood level may enhance participation while eroding reasons for intergroup mistrust

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03 Oct

Making the State local: The Politics of decentralized governance in Pakistan

Pakistan is currently in the midst of its longest uninterrupted phase of democratic politics. The most recent return to democratic politics in Pakistan occurred in 2006, when parliamentary elections marked a transition of power from General Musharraf’s military government to popularly elected governments.

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03 Oct

Myanmar’s Fiscal Decentralization and Public Service Impediments

Relocating more budget to subnational entities could be one of the means of bringing about fiscal decentralization to achieve better and efficient local services for the people of Myanmar. 

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07 Jul

Brexit: a European dispute of a global scale

With the tangible evidence of massive social, political and economic loses for the poorest ones, Brexit is not only about politics, but also it is an ethical fact of a global scale.

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07 Jul

Brexit: less political correctness and less meritocracy!

To the extent that a functioning democracy requires all its classes and all its interests to be represented competently, existing tensions represent tough, ugly, but important nuts to crack. Until we crack them, expect more upsets like that of Brexit.

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07 Jul

Brexit: views from Calais

Disputes about Brexit in the UK has mostly developed along two lines: economy and migration. Brexit has increased racism, xenophobia and violence against migrants and refugees. Something that might escalate with French elections. This is what the majority of refugees now fears.

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07 Jul

Brexit: The Future of the British Left

The Left acted as a consensual,  non-revolutionary force throughout, showing apathy towards both the positive and negative claims of each camp. This unveils an overall displacement of the Labour party as a compelling political force.

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07 Jul

Brexit: there is a way to an even stronger Union

In the aftermath of the Brexit, the European leaders need to transform the political discourse within their member states. This means to negotiate in the European political arena an ambitious agenda for reforms, like the so-called European Unemployment Benefit Scheme (EUBS).

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19 Jun

Why Ethiopian plans for Renaissance are so controversial

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) is a gravity dam currently under construction on the Blue Nile River in the Benishangul-Gumuz Region of Ethiopia, about 15 km (9 mi) east of the border with Sudan.

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13 Jun

"Beira will be a safer, more sustainable, prosperous and beautiful city"

Beira is practically under siege from tropical cyclones, storm surges, floods and the rising sea level. A new Dutch plan promises to solve problems.

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05 Jun

The earthquake as it is

On April 16 at 18:58:37 a powerful earthquake struck Ecuador. More than 500 people were killed and thousands homeless. Six weeks later, a diary of this never-ending tragedy.

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30 May

Cooperation and development have changed

Interview with Laura Frigenti, director of the newly formed AICS, Italian Agency for Cooperation and Development

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24 May

Ethiopia is in the grip of drought and hunger

Ethiopia is once again in the grip of a devastating drought, with millions people in need of emergency food aid and other assistances. Failed seasonal rains have led the country where more than 80 percent of people rely on rain-fed agriculture and livestock to worst humanitarian crises.

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17 May

Rising Powers: a political and philosophical exchange

The rise of the so-called ‘new donors’ and increasingly successful forms of direct economic investments from former recipient-countries to the worst-off countries in the Global South poses a challenge to those efforts that try to construct a normative conception of development. 

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27 Apr

Juvenile Justice in conflict

The Juvenile Justice (JJ) Act 2015 came into effect amid much controversy on January 15, 2016 after receiving the Presidential assent in December 2015. Provision in Juvenile Justice Act (2015) allows for children between the ages of 16-18 to be tried as adults when charged for heinous crimes such as rape and murder. The article examines the consequences of this change.

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27 Apr

Two years of Modi government: assessing gender equality results

Vasudha Katju offers a clear account of the NDA government’s position on women’s issues. While the current government has lunched various scheme with the aim of advancing gender equality several matters remain unsettled.

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27 Apr

NDA's Fiscal Policy

Government is not raising enough tax revenues to spend on sectors that it has promised to spend on.

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27 Apr

The Clean India Mission: making India open defecation free

As per the WHO more than 61% of the Indian population defecates outdoors. To address this issue the Swach Bharat Abhiyan (clean India) initiative was launched in 2014. This article examines the progress made provides constructive suggestions for its improvement.

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27 Apr

Status of the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act – A Reality Check

As the current government under Bharatiya Janta Party (BJP) completes two years, this articles examines how concerned it is towards the villages, poor and farmers in reality.

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22 Apr

Dunes of starvation: A story of Pakistan’s Tharparkar desert

Haroon goes into the alarming situation of children and young mothers in the Tharparkar desert, Pakistan.

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19 Apr

A new agenda to fight sexual violence?

While sexual violence has been committed in many conflicts on a large scale, perpetrators are rarely prosecuted. Recent decisions at the International Criminal Court (ICC), however, could strengthen the prosecution of rape and other forms of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV).

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15 Apr

The Chinese way to economic reforms

Dubbed the “Lianghui” or “Two Sessions”, China’s annual plenary sessions of the National People’s Congress and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference were held in Beijing early this March. As one of the major focuses of the sessions, China’s growth target for 2016 and new agenda for economic reform were also set forward.

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03 Apr

Human Trafficking: Creating the kingdom of means

Zimbabwe, a country weighed down by the serious economic meltdown, high unemployment rate and crippling droughts, has become a fertile hunting ground for human traffickers who are targeting young women. 

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31 Mar

China: rural migrants that are not businessmen

China’s recent “new normal” growth and ongoing economic reform is destined to hurt the interests of rural migrant workers. In response to that, what Chinese government proposes is to let them go home and become self-employed without fully understanding the difficulties for them to start up businesses.

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15 Mar

Diamonds on the inside

Diamonds, they say, are a girl’s best friend, but rough diamonds in Zimbabwe seem otherwise. The diamonds have brought a myriad of problems to more than 100 000 people living around Marange diamond fields.

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13 Mar

Waste, poverty and politics

In Zambia, street vending is transforming cities and towns such as Lusaka, Livingstone, Ndola and Kitwe. Here, this is not just one among many other social phenomena: street vending epitomizes a lack of political vision.

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11 Mar

Refugee crisis: there is much more to do to fight GBV

We are far from an inclusive and long-term solution to GBV and the demands of women in their way to Europe. Political and humanitarian responses in Europe still demand urgent reforms, with a pressing need to coordinate the two levels, national and supranational.

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08 Mar

A war on drugs, again?

The debate around the so-called war on drugs has been going on for nearly half a decade. However, discussions around the (in)effectiveness of global drug policies have become more intense in the run-up to the UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the world drug problem, which will take place in April this year.

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05 Mar

‘No Outlaws in the Gender Galaxy’

‘No Outlaws in the Gender Galaxy’ (Zubaan, 2015) documents the social, economic, spatial, physical and emotional experiences of being persons assigned gender female at birth (PAGFB).

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02 Mar

A woman in the Tharparkar desert

Tari, is among half million labors and farmers working in the Tharparkar desert, a region where thousands of children die due to malnutrition.

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29 Feb

Why social entreprises can be so political in Egypt

Youth started to take small steps to tackle long-lasting social problems through social enterprises. They work at the grassroots levels; segments that are often ignored by the government.

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26 Feb

The danger of TPP

After over five years of closed-doors negotiations, on February 4th the Trans-Pacific Trade Agreement (known as TPP) was signed by 12 countries that concentrate 40% of world trade – a third of the global economy. While governments claim that it would boost economic activity and increase employment, NGOs and citizens’ movements are concerned about the effects this agreement could have on people’s rights and freedoms.

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23 Feb

Zimbabwe: that is not just another sunny day

El Niño has unveiled the shortcomings of President Robert Mugabe’s controversial land reform programme. As the drought bites, the government of Zimbabwe says more than 2.4 million people face food insecurity this year.

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20 Feb

Operation ASHA: using technology to fight TB

An interview with Dr Shelly Batra, president and founder of Operation Asha, on Tuberculosis, technology and service delivery inside and outside India.

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16 Feb

Giulio Regeni, Omar Hazek and the 1411

Sadly, the brutal fate of Giulio Regeni is not new to Egyptians. Prominent human rights organizations have documented over 1411 cases of forced disappearances in Egypt during 2015, in which the disappeared people turn up to be in prison, dead, or their whereabouts remain to be unknown. In addition, thousands of activists are facing arbitrary detention and subjected to political mass trials, with some of them exceeding the maximum period for pre-trial detention, which is two years.

 

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14 Feb

Zambia: That is not just another sunny day

El Niño has brought countries in the Southern Africa region in the grip of an intense drought, which is getting more and more severe with dramatic consequences for food security programs, health and economic output.

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11 Feb

Don't forget to phone Grandpa

The Kenya poverty data shows that out of the total old people in Kenya, 78.6 per cent are poor with 53.2 per cent absolute poor and 25.4 per cent hardcore poor. With the retirement age in Kenya set at 55, the erosion of social relationships and rural/urban migration, the elderly lack income to access necessities, such as balanced meals and appropriate health services.

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09 Feb

How the World Bank is relaxing its human rights standards

As the World Bank is updating its policies to protect societies and the environment, experts and non-governmental organizations warn that a watering down of the standards could harm the vulnerable in developing countries and undermine human rights.

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04 Feb

Why participatory learning can be so important

The future of education in Latina America depends largely on quick and effective improvements in the quality of teaching. Fundación Escuela Nueva, with its peculiar comprehensive and partecipatory approach, has become a leading NGO in the region. Here, they explain how they have made it.

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01 Feb

Too young to be a mother. Too young to be a wife

Pregnancy-related school dropouts have become a matter of public concern in Zambia. In 2014, according to statistics from Zambia’s ministry of General education, at the secondary school level, about 13,200 cases have been recorded; while 4,800 cases have been recorded at the primary school level.

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27 Jan

Bolivia should have more reliable data on child poverty

The Sustainable Development Goals have inaugurated ambitious trajectories for the years to come. Measuring the targets is not as easy as one thinks, especially in countries like Bolivia where there is a significant lack of data.  

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25 Jan

“I don’t want to work with a crude religion/secular dichotomy”

Is gender equality only about secular cultures? In this interview, Rajeev Bhargava encourages us to avoid double standards and to look at the very customary practices of discrimination and oppression.

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22 Jan

The Lost Generation

In Egypt, rising youth unemployment is putting at risk a whole generation of highly educated people. The focus on literacy rate standards has redirected major resources to the unedcated people while academic curricula are still inadequate. 

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20 Jan

Drug Abuse

Often, in developing countries, doctors prescribe drugs too easily. This bad practice causes additional health problems and may bring people like Mercy to self-stigmatization

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18 Jan

Why Nigerian farmers can sue multinationals in Europe

A court decision in the Netherlands that allows a Nigerian farmer to sue oil giant Shell could trigger liability and compensation claims by citizens in developing countries against multinationals in Europe.

 

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15 Jan

La Terreur

Radicalization and extremism are central topics in the development community. France and Europe are dealing with a dramatic social crisis. The existing policy agenda is likely to push several marginalized people to radicalization, again.

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13 Jan

Why the “tradition” of sexual harassment affects Egyptian economy and society

Being a woman in Egypt involves going through the torturous experience of sexual harassment on almost daily basis. Evidence shows that more than 99 per cent of Egyptian women have been sexually harassed at least once in their lives. This phenomenon has serious psychological, social and economic consequences.

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13 Jan

38 heads of lettuce per day or 47 slices of bacon?

 

Is bacon more environmentally friendly than bacon? Recently, a group of researchers from the Carnegie Mellon University has compared the energy requirements, water footprint, and greenhouse gas emissions of diet regimens recommended in recent advice from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The authors found that following the recommended USDA diet with reduced meat intake and increased dairy, seafood and vegetables would result in an increase of the related energy demand by 38%, of the water consumption by 10% and of greenhouse gas emissions by 6%. Nevertheless, once again, scientific communication on hot topics that go against the received wisdom loses, at times, key details along the way.

 

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13 Jan

What's behind Botswana's success story

On the 30th of July, 2014, the Secretary General of the Umbrella for Democratic Change (UDC), Botswana’s main opposition party, was involved in a fatal car accident just ten weeks before what was “billed to be Botswana’s most contested election.” The death of Gomolemo Motswaledi sent shockwaves through the opposition movement in Botswana, who suspected foul play.

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23 Dec

The Transition in Mexico

The health of Mexican democracy is under menace. Just a quick look at the regional Latinobarómetro’s databaseon satisfaction with democracy showsthat Mexico is in its lowest historical levels of popular support to democracy. Despite many institutional changes and transformations in the last three decades it does not seem that the reformism during the period of the Mexican transition era has fulfilled the expectations of the population.

 

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23 Dec

War, silence and the politics of crime

Mr Peña Nieto promised a new national militarized force to substitute the army in security policy. Policy has never changed. Only media coverage of criminal and violent news has been changing. The idea of a troubled country has been replaced with an imaginary of growth and economic reforms.

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22 Dec

The never-ending battle of economic growth

The formal political transition has not come together with a radical change in terms of economic outcomes. Once again, a substantial part of the Mexican population lives in poverty.

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22 Dec

Fighting poverty: three decades of lost battles

In Mexico, social policy has been showing only modest results: according to the latest CONEVAL Poverty Report, in 2014 nearly one out of two Mexicans lived in poverty while almost one out of every ten subsisted in extreme living conditions.

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22 Dec

Anticorruption as a Bargaining Chip

In Mexico, before and after the democratic transition, political parties, legislators and pubic officers have been postponing reforms and actions against corruption. New generations are the key to bring more transparency and fairness in Mexican society.

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22 Dec

Render unto Caesar

The recent history of the Left goes hand in hand with the evolution of social policy strategies in the country. The present of Leftist parties reflects a widespread lack of vision in policy making across the ideological spectrum in Mexico.

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12 Dec

Kenyan farmers know what global warming means

In Kenya, where about 75 percent of total agricultural output is produced on rain-fed agricultural lands, the effects of climate change can never go unnoticed.  In 2012, the Government of Kenya estimated that the continued annual burden of the extreme climatic events could cost the economy as much as USD500 million a year, which is equivalent to approximately 2.6 percent of the country’s GDP. 

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09 Dec

The EU at COP21: A deal-maker?

The European Union is one of the diplomatic champions of these climate negotiations regardless of their final outcome. The bloc has been doing its utmost to mobilise international partners in accordance with a progressive history in the climate talks and its long-standing promotion of multilateral cooperation.

 

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07 Dec

An Alternative Resolution to Climate Change

An ideal and ambitious resolution signed by young policy-makers, researchers, activists and leaders of civil society organizations.

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05 Dec

Adaptation after the Paris Negotiations: Who Ought to Foot the Bill?

Right now in Paris the global community is convening in order to create a climate treaty, the ultimate goal of which is to limit the adverse effects of anthropogenic climate change. The bridge to this goal will be built upon two pillars of climate policy. The first pillar is mitigation, or the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change. The second pillar is adaptation, or enhancing our ability to adapt to the destructive side-effects of a rapidly warming world.

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03 Dec

No bucks for the green fund

For a massive economic and energy transition, there must be a rich development fund. Nevertheless, the bigger the pool of money, the larger the controversy that might arise.

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28 Nov

A too simple story

According to the 2014 National Aids Control Council, in Kenya, 21 per cent of those living with HIV are youth between ages 15-24. John told A-id his story.

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25 Nov

Why the Sehariyas won’t escape poverty

A reportage on Sehariya tribe – an extremely poor nomadic tribe that wanders across the states of central India. The extreme poverty in which these people live is shocking and service delivery is very difficult.

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21 Nov

Is Ecuador all you need?

Despite the acclaimed 2008 Constitution, the environmental heritage of Ecuador is in trouble. Populism and the plunge in the oil price make things even more difficult. In the meanwhile, Mr Correa has launched a massive campaign. “All you need is Ecuador,” it says.

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16 Nov

Don’t forget Nepal, again

Rebuilding moves slowly in Nepal, more than 6 months after the earthquake. WFP: «Before winter strikes, the priority is to re-open trails in order to make access to market and trade of goods possible».

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11 Nov

Fear of the other

Despite the UN and several international organizations consider ethnic profiling as a violation of basic human rights, European Government, the US and Israel, among others, keep using identity checks. This does not make cities safer, nevertheless.

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08 Nov

Back to basics: reading, writing and eating

Around 48 per cent of Kenyans lives in poverty and over 40 per cent ‘lacks sufficient food’. Hunger and poverty affect the performances of students dramatically. Grass-roots organizations start pushing for approaches to schooling that are more comprehensive.

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06 Nov

How non-conventional solutions (would) boost sustainable development in India

The second episode of a reportage on rural electrification in India. Now, it is imperative that, in order to ensure adequate electricity supply to all citizens, Mr Modi must think beyond the traditional means of grid connected fossil fuel based supply.

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03 Nov

Why the SDGs are not that sustainable

In this article, by addressing specific aspects in which the proposed targets fall short, we go through the agenda in health, gender, environment and education. Immense progress has been made so far, more realism and less diplomacy would boost international development in the next fifteen years.

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02 Nov

On the gridlock of rural electricity access in India

The first episode of a reportage on rural electrification in India. Efforts made so far are not enough and come at the expenses of a sustainable development in the country.

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26 Oct

The Invisible Woman

Women’s economic contribution through their unpaid work is an essential component of an economy. In the context of developing countries, such contributions are rendered invisible because performed in the private sphere, remaining largely unrecognized.

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23 Oct

PEN Eritrea's fight for the detained and threatened journalists

In Eritrea, repression and insecurity push people to leave the country. An inflexible censorship makes the life of independent journalists impossible. Human rights violations are routine. In this context, PEN Eritrea plays a crucial role to raise awareness inside and outside the country.

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21 Oct

Struggling to stay afloat

While unemployment rate in Kenya stands at 40 percent, 51 per cent of Kenya’s graduates is virtually unemployable. A direct connection between employers and universities may be a pragmatic solution to the problem.

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19 Oct

Better branding and communication will help action in the field

The case of Save the Children shows that there is a troubling amount of distrust stemming from an obvious lack of awareness of INGO activities in Pakistan.

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16 Oct

EXPO 2015 and the global fight for food security

On October 16, the President of the Italian Republic Sergio Mattarella delivered the Carta di Milano to the UN secretary general Ban Ki-Moon. Food security and food sovereignty are key mechanisms in economic and social development, institutions and NGOs are going in the right direction.

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15 Oct

The devil is in the details

How do policy makers choose one way or another in a scenario of unlimited needs and meagre resources? In India, a more nuanced CBA of the situation would have given a better Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program as well as a more comprehensive National Health Policy 2015.

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13 Oct

You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows

Rising temperatures, erratic rains and changes in weather patterns are significantly shaping the face of Zambia’s agriculture and that of other countries in Africa. Rural farmers call for new advocacy strategies and diversification.

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11 Oct

Village Sanitation: a Practitioner’s Diary

Though most people in the villages of India understand the significance of good health, they often overlook its vitality to a good life. My experience in Kotumachagi (Karnataka)

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09 Oct

Everything has a price to pay

Education online has soared. The e-learning industry has increased from 35.6 Billion Dollar in 2011 to 56.2 Billion Dollar in 2015.Not all is good news, MOOCs may reiterate the North-South divide up to undermine local knowledge.

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05 Oct

Indonesia needs reforms in the retail sector

In Indonesia, the population of informal workers, occasional workers and outsourced workers has increased at a rapid average annual rate from six million in 2001 to 11 million in 2010. The importance of the retail sector for employment and economic growth makes this industry one of the top priorities for government regulation as well as a lucrative source of profit for private investment.

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25 Sep

How Soap Operas trigger social change

Stories have existed before recorded history through cave paintings, speeches and gestures, capturing the imagination of people throughout time. Despite the change in method the desire to tell and hear stories remain and has the capacity to influence people’s lives. This is the power of stories and it can be applied in the development sector.

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25 Sep

Do you really want to make it here?

After a long and bruising battle to steer an industry-friendly land acquisition law through India’s Parliament, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government finally waved the white flag last month.

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25 Sep

Fixing the WASHing machine

While the attention of donors is directed towards malaria and HIV, improvements in Water and Sanitation can influence the public health significantly.

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25 Sep

Why we do not need to watch sad-looking children and shabby shoes

From bloated bellies, hopeless parents and the horror of the Syrian refugees, the representation of the disadvantaged has been an important topic in international development in the last thirty years. However, there is still much to do.

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25 Sep

Paris 2015: neither Copenhagen 2009 nor a French revolution

Climate Negotiations are moving painfully slow. Do we have to expect real achievements in Paris 2015?

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25 Sep

RCTs inside and outside India: not only a methodological dispute

The development sector is hungry for methodological alternatives to attack poverty and has found relief in Randomized control trials in the absence of others.

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13 Jan

Why Latin America primary education is so bad

TERCE results had shed some light in LAC countries’ challenges: the need of balancing between the degree of school’s autonomy as learning communities and the central authority; and the importance of differentiating between types of schools (i.e. vocational/academic, secular/religious).

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